Identifying Spawning Redds

steelhead-tactics

Spawning Redds – Avoid Trampling Spawning Beds In the spring and fall here in Ontario, several species of fish make their way into tributaries of the great lakes to spawn.  In the fall, Chinook salmon, Coho salmon, brown trout & rainbow trout make up the bulk of the runs.  In the spring, its mainly rainbow trout with the exception of a few tributaries that have spring salmon runs. Although there are stocking programs in place for these species in Ontario, there are also naturally reproducing populations of all of the above species.  One of the key factors in ensuring these natural stocks are able to continue on is the ability to identify, and avoid trampling the areas in which they

Steelhead Indicator Setup

indicator-setup-fly-fishing

Great Lakes Steelhead Fly Fishing Two very simple, and highly effective steelhead indicator setups for fly fishing great lakes migratory steelhead. Watch More Great Lakes Steelhead Tutorials: Fly Rod Selection – Selecting the right Fly Fishing Rod for great lakes steelhead, salmon and migratory brown trout. Terminal Tackle – What you should be sure to have in your vest when targeting great lakes steelhead. Everything from strike indicators to split shot are covered here. Indicator Setup for Great Lakes Steelhead – Two highly effective steelhead fly fishing indicator setups. Best Flies for Great Lakes Steelhead – An excellent assortment of flies that should be in every great lakes steelheaders fly box. Egg Fly Materials for Steelhead and Brown Trout –

Terminal Tackle – Steelhead

terminal-tackle-for-steelhead-fly-fishing

Great Lakes Steelhead Fly Fishing Ensuring you have the proper terminal tackle for Great Lakes Steelhead Fly Fishing is key in having a successful day on the river. Check out this video to find out exactly what you need to have at all times. Watch More Great Lakes Steelhead Tutorials: Fly Rod Selection – Selecting the right Fly Fishing Rod for great lakes steelhead, salmon and migratory brown trout. Terminal Tackle – What you should be sure to have in your vest when targeting great lakes steelhead. Everything from strike indicators to split shot are covered here. Indicator Setup for Great Lakes Steelhead – Two highly effective steelhead fly fishing indicator setups. Best Flies for Great Lakes Steelhead – An

Fly Rod Selection – Great lakes Steelhead and Browns

Fly Rod selection for Great Lakes Steelhead. In the fall and spring, steelhead, brown trout and salmon head into tributaries of the great lakes en masse. This provides some excellent fishing for several months through the winter and into the spring. Selecting your fly rod for great lakes steelhead is key in ensuring you’ll be able to battle, and best these magnificent creatures! Watch More Great Lakes Steelhead Tutorials: Fly Rod Selection – Selecting the right Fly Fishing Rod for great lakes steelhead, salmon and migratory brown trout. Terminal Tackle – What you should be sure to have in your vest when targeting great lakes steelhead. Everything from strike indicators to split shot are covered here. Indicator Setup for Great

Practice Nymphing – White Sucker Nymph Fishing

Sometimes when we hit the river for migratory trout and salmon in southern Ontario, things don’t work out as planned. Luckily, however, there are usually other options to fill in the time when there just don’t seem to be any of our target species present. You can take advantage of your time out on the water by targeting species such as white sucker, to practice your nymphing and indicator techniques for migratory trout and salmon in great lakes tributaries.

Tiny Black Stonefly Hatch – March in Ontario

This video takes a look at tiny black stoneflies that were hatching while we were out steelheading on March 29, 2009 on the Maitland River in Southern Ontario. These small stoneflies are one of the first insects, aside from midges, to begin hatching in the spring in Ontario. If you plan to be out for steelhead in early spring, consider tying up some tiny black stonefly nymph patterns.

Hellgramite and Stonefly Video

This video takes a look at some Hellgramite Larva and Stonefly Nymphs (the real thing!). These are two of the largest nymph and larva insects that occur in Ontario rivers that are important to fly fishing. Stonefly nymphs cling to the undersides of rocks. Once they have matured as a nymph, stoneflies will crawl up onto the tops of rocks, above the surface of the water and transform into Large flying stoneflies. Hellgramites are quite a bit larger, and have a much different way of transforming from an aquatic insect into an flying insect.

Dry and Dropper – Caddis larva, pupa, elk hair caddis fly

This video takes a look at some caddis larvae and pupae (the real thing!) as well as showing a great fly fishing method called the dry and dropper that you can use the next time you are out on the river. The dry and dropper method is very useful when you can see rising fish but aren’t sure if they are taking emergers or taking flies right off the surface. You simply attach a dry fly trying to ‘match the hatch’ as best you can, and adding a nymph or emerger type fly pattern on a dropper from that fly. The dry fly will act as a strike indicator if a fish takes the nymph or emerger pattern. The patterns

Hendrickson Mayfly Mating Dance Mayfly Spinners Spinnerfall Dry Fly Fishing

Hard to see, but this was a massive hendrickson mayfly mating dance early in June of 2008. Mayflies hatch from the stream at certain times of the year and sometimes hatches overlap making it difficult for the fly fisher to decipher which fly to use. After a period of time, the mayflies that hatched enter a different phase of life. They congregate above the stream as a cloud of madness in a mating frenzy. Eventually you have the event that fly fishers wait for….the may fly spinnerfall.

Small Stream Log Jam Skating Dry Fly Fishing Methods Catching Brook Trout

Small stream fly fishing – Skating dry flies in Log Jams is a very successful method of fly fishing on small streams. This is tutorial on how to do just that! One of the single best fly fishing techniques that I know of is skating dry flies into log jams. Brook trout love to hide in heavy cover, such as log jams, sweepers and overhangs on the banks of streams. Using nymphs to fly fish for these fish can result in many lost flies. Try skating your dry fly straight into log jams as demonstrated in this video.