Ontario's Top Fall Flies

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Fly fishing in Ontario in the fall means different things to different people.  The main quarry at this time of year are Steelhead and Brown trout.  Some species of pacific salmon can also be targeted, but make up a much smaller portion of what folks are targeting this time of year. Here I’ve compiled a list of my top flies for Steelhead and Brown trout in the great lakes region. Egg flies, Globugs,  Yarn Flies Eggflies are one my my go-to flies for the fall and winter season.  When I’m nymphing, or fishing an indicator setup, you can pretty much be guaranteed that you’ll find a globug pattern attached to my rig somewhere.  Make sure you keep a good supply

Tiny Double Egg Steelhead Fly – McFly Foam

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Egg flies were designed to resemble the eggs of fish, and in particular the eggs of migratory species such as Chinook salmon and Rainbow trout.  They come in as many colours and sizes as there are tyers, and their usefulness as a late fall and winter and early spring steelheading fly is well proven.  This pattern is tied very small and is useful when the water is low and gin clear and the fish are easily spooked.  From experience, the best material to use when tying these egg flies is McFly foam which should be available at your local fly shop. [singlepic id=50 w=500 float=center] Hook size 14 egg fly Thread white 8/0 Egg McFly Foam Fly Pattern Specific Rivers:

Fly Fishing The Bighead River

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Information on the Bighead river in southern Ontario. This river is probably best known for its run of steelhead rainbow trout in the fall and spring. It is also host to an excellent cold water fishery in its upper reaches. The Bighead River is a river in southern Ontario which flows from the Niagara Escarpment near Chatsworth, Ontario and empties into Nottawasaga Bay, an inletof Georgian Bay, at Meaford, Ontario. There are several hiking trails along the river including ‘Trout Hollow Trail’ and sections of the Bruce Trail. It is a small river. Really only the locals and seasoned veterans know the upper reaches due to its thrashingly thick bush and untouched banks. Private property conceals most of the river.