Spring Wiggler Steelhead and Salmon

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The Spring Wiggler has been one of my main flies for steelhead and salmon.  I’m not sure if its because it does a good job of imitating Hexagenia nymphs, but I know one thing….it works and it works well.  I remember a day out on a local stream in November.  It was cold and very bright.  This fly managed to bring 4 coho salmon and one migratory brown trout to hand that day. The Spring Wiggler fly pattern is also an excellent choice for resident trout fishing in Ontario. [singlepic id=21 w=500 float=center] Hook size 10 nymph hook Thread 6/0 any natural colour Tail and Overbody squirrel tail Body tan dubbing Hackle Short Cock Hackle Head thread Weight optional

Chocolate Bunny Bead Head Nymph

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The Chocolate Bunny has been for several years now one of my “Go To” nymphs for just about any trout or salmon species.  It seems to imitate many mayfly nymphs, as well as stoneflies and possibly some caddis larva as well.  The year I began fly fishing, I tied this fly using  Hares Ear Dubbin, of the chocolate colour.  Try the fly with or without a bead and make sure you have several different sizes of the fly as well. [singlepic id=20 w=500 float=center] Hook size 8-16 nymph hook Thread brown 6/0 Ribbing gold wire Body chocolate hares ear dubbin Wing Case Turkey feather fibres Head bead or thread, your choice

Badger Butt Bead Head Mayfly Nymph

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The ‘Badger Butt’ nymph is a neat little nymph that will imitate a number of mayfly nymphs.  The badger I used for this fly was grey/tan in colour, while the very tips of the fur were thin and black.  When you snip off the badger fur from the hide, be sure to snip it off right at the base, as you’ll want to use the underfur as dubbing for this fly.  Beads can be the colour of your choice.  I try to use dark coloured beads when fishing clear water, and I’ll switch to a gold or silver bead when the water is a little off colour to add a little flash to the fly. [singlepic id=52 w=500 float=center] Hook

The Classic Wooly Bugger

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Wooley Buggers can be used anywhere for any species.  Because they suggest such a wide variety of food items, it doesn’t matter if you are fishing bass in a lake, or brookies in a creek, wooly buggers can sometimes be the ticket to a very successfull day on the water.  Depending on what type of insect or other species you are trying to immitate, wooly buggers do a fine job of tricking fish into believing they are dragonfly nymphs, leeches & minnows.  Very simple to tie, and I’d recommend to anyone who fly fishes that this be one fly that always has a place in your fly box. [singlepic id=24 w=625] Tying Materials: Hook Streamer hook size 6-12 Thread uni

High Stick Nymphing for Trout

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This is an extremely effective and neat way to nymph! Otherwise known as shortline nymphing, heavy nymphs and long rods are a bonus in most cases. Below the waters surface is a world like no other. Minnows, leeches and other creatures lurk about, hoping they are not being watched by a big trout. What we are concerned with here however is not a minnow or a leech, but larvae, pupae and nymphs. Streams abound with these pre-flight creatures year round, so its not all that surprising that the diet of a trout consists of some 70-80% nymphs taken below the surface. With different species, different water conditions and water quality, it can seem quite daunting at first to look below

Small Stream Fly Fishing

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Techniques and Tactics for small stream Fly Fishing Looking to hit some small streams or creeks this season? The effort you put into understanding how to fish creeks and small streams will pay off directly in your success with fishing these areas. Most of the small streams we have in Ontario see far less pressure than the larger, open rivers we have. Casting,  accessibility and frustration probably play a large role in why these streams see so little action from fly fishers. Generally, these streams will be about 15 feet wide at their widest, will have terribly overgrown banks and plenty of log jams to hang up on. It takes several trips and many, many lost flies to perfect your