Chocolate Bunny Bead Head Nymph

bead-head-nymph

The Chocolate Bunny has been for several years now one of my “Go To” nymphs for just about any trout or salmon species.  It seems to imitate many mayfly nymphs, as well as stoneflies and possibly some caddis larva as well.  The year I began fly fishing, I tied this fly using  Hares Ear Dubbin, of the chocolate colour.  Try the fly with or without a bead and make sure you have several different sizes of the fly as well. [singlepic id=20 w=500 float=center] Hook size 8-16 nymph hook Thread brown 6/0 Ribbing gold wire Body chocolate hares ear dubbin Wing Case Turkey feather fibres Head bead or thread, your choice

Smyth Stonefly

smithstonesideview

This fly resembles a black stonefly larva.  It’s tied to be about an inch in lenght from tail tips to the front of the antennae.  Used mainly as a steelhead and migratory brown trout fly, its also useful in smaller streams and when fishing rivers for resident trout species. [singlepic id=48 w=625 float=center] Hook size 10-12 nymph hook Thread brown 6/0 Tail Black Turkey Biot Ribbing Clear UTC viny Body Black or brown fine dubbing Thorax Hackle to match body colour Wingcase turkey feather segment (underside folded over and exposed) Head brown or black thread Bottom View [singlepic id=47 w=325 float=center] Side View [singlepic id=48 w=325 float=center] Top View [singlepic id=49 w=325 float=center] Fly Pattern Specific Rivers: Saugeen River Credit

Tiny Black Stonefly Nymph

23__625x_tinyblackstonetopview

Tiny Black Stonefly Nymph [singlepic id=23 w=625 float=center] Hook size 12 – 18 nymph Thread brown 8/0 Tail black goose biots Body black hares ear dub Rib fine gold wire Wingcase turkey feather segment Head thread head Antennae black goose biots Tie this fly in various colours and sizes to ‘match the hatch’ in your area. Side View [singlepic id=22 w=325 float=center] Top View [singlepic id=23 w=325 float=center]

Hellgramite and Stonefly Video

This video takes a look at some Hellgramite Larva and Stonefly Nymphs (the real thing!). These are two of the largest nymph and larva insects that occur in Ontario rivers that are important to fly fishing. Stonefly nymphs cling to the undersides of rocks. Once they have matured as a nymph, stoneflies will crawl up onto the tops of rocks, above the surface of the water and transform into Large flying stoneflies. Hellgramites are quite a bit larger, and have a much different way of transforming from an aquatic insect into an flying insect.